Federal Government Contractor | Mental health treatment

Federal Probation and Pretrial

 

 

Since 1995, I have served as an individual mental health provider for the United States Southern District of New York, Departments of Probation and Pretrial.

 

Mental health treatment is a tool that helps United States probation and pretrial services officers supervise or monitor defendants and offenders in the community.

Treatment, which includes services such as psychological/psychiatric evaluations; individual, family, or group counseling; and medication, is provided to persons who suffer from mental health problems.

These persons either are under pretrial supervision while awaiting a court appearance, on probation, or on parole or supervised release after serving time in prison.

Treatment is ordered either by a United States district court of the United States Parole Commission as a condition of releasing defendants and offenders to the community.

The aim is to help persons cope with their legal situation, adjust to life post-incarceration, and provide a framework of treatment recommendations for both federal judges and officers.

Mental health treatment provides officers with the ability and means to identify, assess, and provide care for defendants and offenders with mental disorders.

This entails providing psychotherapy to offenders who are on probation following incarceration or as a sentence in and of itself.

For pretrial clients, it means working with individuals who may be awaiting trial or sentencing as a result of being accused or found guilty of a federal crime. My office provides a discreet and private where I often see high profile clients whose anonymity can be easily maintained.

Pretrial clients are often referred to me to help cope with the stress of their impending trial or sentencing. The prospect of incarceration looms for all of them.

This can be a terrifying situation to confront and the stress often leads to anxiety, depression and, in some cases, suicidal ideation.

Even if the pretrial period does not result in incarceration, these individuals face great financial hardships, severe family and relationship problems and the potential loss of their job or career.

Those on probation face the unique challenge of rebuilding their lives following a conviction and, most often, incarceration. Adjustment after serving time in federal prison can be difficult in so many ways.

It means getting accustomed to on learning behavioral patterns necessary to survive in prison which may be detrimental after their release. It also includes dealing with the stress of re-developing a family or support system, finding employment or, in some cases, a place to live.

In addition to post incarceration adjustment, the client is helped to recognize in a dress pattern that led to their situation and maintain a lifestyle free from recalcitrant patterns.

It may also be as simple as adjusting to the pressures of living in New York City, where anger management may be necessary simply to cope with a crowded subway car.

It is my role to provide assessments and ongoing treatment for clients as well as consultation with officers and judges.

It has also given me the ability to work with private clients facing extreme legal difficulties. This includes consulting with lawyers as well, providing assessments and recommendations.

Since 1995, Peter has been a mental health treatment services provider for the United States Pretrial and Probation Offices – Southern District of New York.

Mental health treatment is a tool that helps United States probation and pretrial services officers supervise or monitor defendants and offenders in the community.

Treatment, which includes services such as psychological/psychiatric evaluations; individual, family, or group counseling; and medication, is provided to persons who suffer from mental health problems.

These persons either are under pretrial supervision while awaiting a court appearance, on probation, or on parole or supervised release after serving time in prison.

Treatment is ordered either by a United States district court of the United States Parole Commission as a condition of releasing defendants and offenders to the community.

The aim is to help persons cope with their legal situation, adjust to life post-incarceration, and provide a framework of treatment recommendations for both federal judges and officers.

Mental health treatment provides officers with the ability and means to identify, assess, and provide care for defendants and offenders with mental disorders.

Source: Southern District New York Pretrial Services