Individual Therapy

”Psychotherapy presents the patient with the opportunity to reconsider how
they perceive themselves in relation to their past, their present situation, and how they can better proceed going forward.”

~ Peter C. Turco

 

Overview

Psychotherapy is a general term for treating mental health problems by talking with a psychiatrist, psychologist or other mental health providers.

During Individual psychotherapy, you learn about your condition and your moods, feelings, thoughts, and behaviors. Psychotherapy helps you learn how to take control of your life and respond to challenging situations with healthy coping skills.

Psychotherapy can be helpful in treating most mental health problems, including:

 talking with a psychiatrist, psychologist or other mental health providers.

During Individual psychotherapy, you learn about your condition and your moods, feelings, thoughts, and behaviors. Psychotherapy helps you learn how to take control of your life and respond to challenging situations with healthy coping skills.

It is a one-on-one, ongoing exchange between an interested individual and trained psychotherapy professional. It is an opportunity to address patterns, behaviors, and symptoms that have served as barriers on a daily or long-term basis.

It also presents the participant with the opportunity to reconsider how they proceed in their lives. The hope being that they gain more from important life areas. It can be characterized as an advanced course in you, meaning an opportunity to learn more about yourself, what has motivated you in the past, what is holding you back and what you might be able to do differently in the future.

Psychotherapy can be helpful in treating most mental health problems, including:

  • Anxiety Disorders such as obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), phobias, panic disorder or post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD)
  • Mood Disorders such as depression or bipolar disorder
  • Addictions such as alcoholism, drug dependence or compulsive gambling
  • Eating Disorders such as anorexia or bulimia
  • Personality Disorders such as borderline personality disorder or dependent personality disorder
  • Schizophrenia or other disorders that cause detachment from reality (psychotic disorders)

Not everyone who benefits from psychotherapy is diagnosed with a mental illness. Psychotherapy can help with a number of life’s stresses and conflicts that can affect anyone. For example, it may help you:

  • Resolve Conflicts with your partner or someone else in your life
  • Relieve Anxiety or Stressdue to work or other situations
  • Cope with Major Life Changes such as divorce, the death of a loved one or the loss of a job
  • Learn to Manage Unhealthy Reactionssuch as road rage or passive-aggressive behavior
  • Come to Terms with an Ongoing or Serious Physical Health Problem such as diabetes, cancer or long-term (chronic) pain
  • Recover from Physical or Sexual Abuse or witnessing violence
  • Cope with Sexual Problemswhether they’re due to a physical or psychological cause
  • Sleep Betterespecially if you have trouble getting to sleep or staying asleep (insomnia)

In some cases, psychotherapy can be as effective as medications, such as antidepressants. However, depending on your specific situation, psychotherapy alone may not be enough to ease the symptoms of a mental health condition. You may also need medications or other treatments.

Individual psychotherapy is also a very creative process where the professional can engage the patient in different areas and at all levels as they see appropriate to the situation.

It calls for honesty and openness on both the part of the patient and the clinician. An effective psychotherapist will understand you, challenge you and help you develop your own internal mechanisms for overall better life.

My own approach is both patient and interactive. 30+ years of experience has taught me not to mince words and to recognize a very broad range of problems, needs, and the best way to address them. I ask my patients for their honesty, especially if they are in disagreement with something we are doing.

Very often it helps someone to be direct with the therapist if they are having trouble being direct with others. Our aim would be to help you to be your most authentic self while you learn to address symptoms, modify behaviors, improve your outlook, and see tangible results throughout our work together.

If medication needs to be considered, I have a number of psychiatric professionals to refer to. We would work in a collaborative effort on your behalf.

Source: APA